The Style Files No. 10
March 15, 2017
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The Style Files No. 10

ugh, yet another home we wish was ours.

We’re churning these Style Files posts out like there’s no tomorrow – but you love it. So here’s another one to gawp over. If you’re new to us – Style Files is our regular feature on homeowners with inspiring homes to get you in the mood for some decorating. This week we chat to Sophie Bush whose East London warehouse home, is an industrial addicts dream…

…To tell you a bit about Sophie she has over a decade’s publishing experience, working for some of the world’s most renowned magazine brands. With a long-held passion for architecture and interior design, and following the purchase of her home in a warehouse conversion, she left WIRED magazine in 2014 to launch her own media brand Warehouse Home. 

 

 

 What is the inspiration behind your home?

In 2012, I bought my home in a warehouse conversion in East London. Industrial conversions are filled with grit and character. There’s an authenticity and originality to such properties and their features, and a real sense of heritage. These are not cookie-cutter homes. Every property is unique. I was inspired by the history of this building – it once served as a rice mill and is now grade II listed. So I deliberately sourced furniture, lighting and decorative accessories to suit its original Victorian features and to draw attention to distinctive elements like the loading bay doors and exposed brickwork.

house tour style files no 10

“I was inspired by the history of this building – it once served as a rice ed”

“I was inspired by the history of this building – it once served as a rice mill and is now grade II listed”

house tour style files

 What would be your advice to someone wanting to create a home like yours? 

There are so many different ways to interpret ‘industrial style’ and you certainly don’t have to live in an industrial conversion in order to get the look. You might opt for a raw industrial aesthetic characterised by concrete, plywood and bare metals; or you might choose a vintage look punctuated by classic factory designs sourced from vintage and salvage shops; alternatively, you might select a modern look that incorporates industrial design classics from brands like Tolix and Lampe Gras. The great thing about channelling an ‘industrial style’ is that you can combine raw, vintage and contemporary elements to fantastic effect. If you are lucky enough to live in an industrial conversion with features like exposed brick, these elements can take a bold scheme and one or two heavy-duty designs will really enhance the unique character of the building. But minimalist contemporary apartments and country cottages can easily accommodate industrial touches too – start with smaller items, such as light fixtures and decorative accessories, to build your confidence. These Diesel Living with Seletti plates, for example, have cog-inspired forms and will bring a subtle industrial touch to any dining table. And there are industrial style lights to suit every space. 

 

house tour style files

If you could only own one homeware item, what would it be? 

The item I couldn’t live without in my home office is my very large vintage library trolley. A beautiful piece of furniture in itself, it is also practical and a great place to store all of my reference books! If I was allowed a second essential item it would be my Lampe Gras N°207 from DCW éditions. It’s a design classic that adds real style to my desk and provides focus light on whatever I’m reading.

style files house tour
  1. How would you define your style? 

I’ve adopted a vintage industrial style, sourcing furniture from expert suppliers like LASSCO, Retrouvius and The Old Cinema. I love pieces with history and a story to tell, but they’re juxtaposed with contemporary designs. I think it’s that combination of vintage and contemporary that makes ‘loft living’ so popular. 

How would you define your style? 

vintage industrial style

house tour style file no 9

Whats you best piece of advice for working with white in a home?

Whether you’re looking for a rustic or soft industrial effect, white is a really efficient way to soften authentic industrial features. Painting wooden ceiling beams as well as exposed brickwork in shades of white will immediately enhance natural light and create a softer look and feel while enhancing the natural light. This can be further complemented by the use of soft textures such as linen and cotton and light-toned woods. We featured the warehouse home of chef and entrepreneur Patrick Drake (picture above) in Warehouse Home Issue Five it perfectly demonstrates how the use of white with soft textures can create a tranquil and inviting soft-industrial scheme. 

house tour style files

Warehouse Home is a startup media brand that has been entirely self funded to date. The magazine has already been read in over 100 countries, but now raising investment in order to scale the business substantially. Check out their campaign page here – https://www.seedrs.com/warehouse-home  

Image Credit: Debbie Bragg 

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